Consortium for Media Literacy

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Purrfect Delivery

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In this MediaLit Moment, students are entertained by a recent anti-smoking PSA that has received more than three million views on YouTube.  Use the clip for a mini-deep deconstruction exercise where students watch, listen, and evaluate the techniques used to create the message.

Ask students why this particular clip went viral

AHA! This message made me laugh so I’m sharing it will all of my friends

Grade Level: 6-9

Key Question #2: What creative techniques are used to attract my attention?
Core Concept #2: Media messages are constructed using a creative language with its own rules.

Key Question #5: Why is this message being sent?
Core Concept #5: Most media messages are organized to gain profit and/or power (in this case, power of persuasion).

Materials: Computer with internet access and projector. Here is the link to the PSA: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tLtschJxRy8  

Activity: Show the video three times without giving any explanation to students except to watch and listen without commenting. Play the video on a big screen for the class.  Then play it again without the sound – just video.  The third time, play the sound only – no video. Ask students to comment on the creative techniques used to make this film.  Would the clip have been as effective without all of the elements coming together?Was the message clear? Were students persuaded not to smoke? What was the most compelling part of the message? Cats, music, text…Would it have been better to use humans? Was YouTube the right platform for releasing this video? Why or why not?
 

 

The Five Core Concepts and Five Key Questions of media literacy were developed as part of the Center for Media Literacy’s MediaLit Kit™ and Questions/TIPS (Q/TIPS)™ framework. Used with permission, ©2002-2016, Center for Media Literacy, http://www.medialit.com.


In this MediaLit Moment, students
are entertained by a recent anti
-
smokin
g PSA that
has
received more
than
three
million views on YouT
ube.
Use the clip
for a
mini
-
deep deconstruction
exercise
where
students watch, listen, and evaluate the techniques used to create the message.
Ask students
why
this
particular clip
went viral
AHA!
This
message made me laugh so I’m sharing it will all of my friends
Grade Level:
6
-
9
Key Question #2:
What creative techniques are used to attract my attention?
Core Concept #2:
Media messages are constructed using a creative language with its ow
n rules
.
Key Question #
5
:
Why is this message being sent?
Core Concept #
5
:
Most media messages are
organized
to gain profit and/or power (
in this case,
power
of persuasion).
Materials:
Computer with internet access and projector
.
Here is the
link
to the PSA
:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tLtschJxRy8
Activity:
Show
the video three times without giving any explanation
to students
except to watch and
listen without commenting
. Play the v
ideo
on a big screen
for the class. Then play it again without the
sound
just video
. The third time
,
play the sound only
no video. Ask students to comment on the
creative techniques used to make
this film
. Would
the
clip
have
been as effective
withou
t all of the
elements coming together?
Was the message clear?
Were students persuaded not to smoke?
What
was the most
compelling
part of the message?
Cats, music, text...Would it have been better to use
humans?
Was YouTube the right
platform
for releasing t
his video? Why or why not?
The Five Core Concepts and Five Key Questions of media literacy were developed as part of the Center for Media Literacy’s
MediaLit Kit™ and Questions/TIPS (Q/TIPS)™ framework. Used with permission, ©2002
-
2016, Center f
or Media Literacy,
Last Updated ( Friday, 31 March 2017 11:16 )  
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